London
Attractions

BUCKINGHAM PALACE


Since 1837, Buckingham Palace has been the official residence of the British sovereigns. It is here where events involving the Royal Family take place; heads of states are received at the palace as well. In front of the building, tourists gather to celebrate the famous Changing of the Guard.

WESTMINSTER PALACE AND BIG BEN


Westminster Palace is the seat of the British Parliament. Big Ben, the enormous 13.5-tonne belle, adds rhythm to Londoners’ lives, and is located in the Clock Tower (now called the Elizabeth Tower).

WESTMINSTER ABBEY


Built under Henry III in the 13th century, Westminster Abbey accommodated nearly all the coronations of the English monarchs. The building also features a royal necropolis where many kings and queens of England are buried.

TOWER BRIDGE AND THE TOWER OF LONDON


Built in 1894 to reduce congestion in East London, Tower Bridge is a drawbridge (also known as a ‘bascule’ bridge). Opposite the bridge is the Tower of London. In addition to housing the Crown Jewels, this ancient fortress has lived through a thousand years of torment, and has a history filled with fury, blood and legends.

ST PAUL’S CATHEDRAL


Located in the heart of the city, St Paul’s Cathedral is recognisable by its dome inspired by that of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Over the course of its 1,400-year history, the structure has burnt to the ground many times and been rebuilt. The present state of the church dates back to the end of the 17th century. Make sure to test the Whispering Gallery, where a whispered word can be heard more than 34 metres away.

THE LONDON EYE


The London Eye is a Ferris wheel installed for the festivities of the year 2000. Its 32 air-conditioned passenger cars accommodate 35 people. The wheel advances very slowly – a full turn takes 30 minutes.

THE SHARD


This 310-metre glass spire, inaugurated in 2012, is home to luxury offices and apartments. Italian architect Renzo Piano designed the structure. Two floors are open to visitors and offer an exceptional view of the city.

HYDE PARK


One of the capital’s nine Royal Parks, Hyde Park is located in Central London. The space features more than 4,000 trees, a lake, rose gardens and the renowned ‘Speakers’ Corner’ where people can express their thoughts freely.

PICCADILLY CIRCUS


Located in London’s West End, Piccadilly Circus is known for its illuminated signs, its famous shops and its fountain dedicated to philanthropist Lord Shaftesbury. The fountain features a bronze sculpture that has become a true symbol of London.

TRAFALGAR SQUARE


Named to commemorate the victory of Trafalgar against the Franco-Spanish fleet in 1805, Trafalgar Square is a hub where people can express their ideas. A number of embassies and the National Gallery are located here.

COVENT GARDEN


The Covent Garden neighbourhood is one of the city’s greatest tourist attractions. It is known for its large market, which is located beneath a magnificent glass roof in a building that dates back to 1830. The neighbourhood has about 60 theatres, including the Royal Opera House and the Drury Lane Theatre. The latter is the oldest theatre in London, since the first building that housed the theatre dates back to 1663.

THE CITY OF LONDON


The City of London is both the geographical centre of the city and its historic core. Around the City, traces of the Romans’ London Wall remain. The area is now a famous business district and home to the London Stock Exchange.

NOTTING HILL AND PORTOBELLO ROAD MARKET


Notting Hill, with its pastel-coloured houses, is one of the trendiest neighbourhoods in London. At the Portobello Road Market – a major tourist attraction – visitors search for memories and antiques.

THAMES BARRIER


Located downstream from London, the Thames Barrier is designed to prevent flooding in the event of high tides and storms. It was inaugurated by the Queen in 1984, and should protect the capital until 2070.